John Goulder

Design maker

Jon Goulder is a fourth generation furniture maker, he left his family business to study furniture design and fine woodworking at Canberra School of art under the direction of the late George Ingham. After leaving Canberra School of Art he established his design consultancy - Jon Goulder Designer Maker. Continue reading...

 
 
 
 
 

Doug Gimesy

PHOTOJOURNALIST

Doug is a conservation, wildlife and animal welfare photojournalist, with a focus on Australian issues. His work has been published by National Geographic, BioGraphic, Australian Geographic, Ranger Rick, The Big Issue and in papers such as the NY Times and The Australian. His recent work has focused on the conservation and animal welfare issues that face the platypus, the Grey-headed Flying-fox, and the little blue penguins of Melbourne. He is an Associate Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers and is also governor of the World Wide Fund for Nature (Australia).

A contributing photographer to National Geographic Creative and the Nature Picture Library, Doug has been a finalist in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year and the Big Picture Natural World competitions, has won the Australian Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year ‘Our Impact’ category, and most recently, won the inaugural Wildscreen Panda PhotoStory Award.Doug is a conservation, wildlife and animal welfare photojournalist, with a focus on Australian issues. His work has been published by National Geographic, BioGraphic, Australian Geographic, Ranger Rick, The Big Issue and in papers such as the NY Times and The Australian. His recent work has focused on the conservation and animal welfare issues that face the platypus, the Grey-headed Flying-fox, and the little blue penguins of Melbourne. He is an Associate Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers and is also governor of the World Wide Fund for Nature (Australia).

A contributing photographer to National Geographic Creative and the Nature Picture Library, Doug has been a finalist in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year and the Big Picture Natural World competitions, has won the Australian Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year ‘Our Impact’ category, and most recently, won the inaugural UK Wildscreen Panda PhotoStory Award.

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Andrea Wyatt

Water colour artist

Andrea Wyatt is a successful water coulour artist, painting Australian Landscapes and Wildlife. She is based in South Australia, in the beautiful Adelaide Hills.

Andrea has had a number of solo exhibitions, and in recent years has been a finalist in the esteemed Waterhouse Natural History prize as well as winning Works on Paper at the 2014 Solar Art Prize. Andrea has been a finalist in the Solar Art Prize for 4 years running, as well as the Hahndorf Academy Adelaide Hills Art Prize. 

Andrea has loved drawing ever since high school and her interest has always been held by nature, Australian landscapes and the environment. After completing a degree in Rural Science at the University of New England, she worked with farmers, helping them improve the land, plant native trees and understand the fragile balance that exists between farming and maintaining a healthy environment. In this time, she encouraged and participated in the planting of hundreds of thousands of native trees across the Central Tablelands of New South Wales and educated landholders in the importance of the local flora and fauna in the whole system.

This early part of her career highlighted the fact that a lot of Australians want to improve the environment, but are sometimes unaware of what lies within their local areas and what role they all play in improving landscape management.

This early background has had a profound impact on the landscapes that she now depicts in her paintings. The many layers of the landscape are unfolded within her pictures as she uses magnifications and photopolymer panels that show some of the small animals, birds and plants that we might not notice with a quick glimpse or drive through the landscape. Always the educator, she also give scientific names or descriptions to inform observers of the animals or plants that are illustrated.